Victoria Tips

Read these 77 Victoria Tips tips to make your life smarter, better, faster and wiser. Each tip is approved by our Editors and created by expert writers so great we call them Gurus. LifeTips is the place to go when you need to know about Australian tips and hundreds of other topics.

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What can I do in Victoria?

Wilsons Promontory National Park

Wilsons Promontory National Park Just three hours from Melbourne is one of the finest national parks in the country, the 50,000 hectare Wilsons Promontory National Park.
Wilsons Promontory - which juts out into Bass Strait - constitutes the southernmost point of the Australian mainland. It was described by explorer George Bass as the "cornerstone of this continent called "New Holland" after he saw the Prom in the first days of 1798.
Bass named the area Furneaux's Land but it was later renamed in honour of a prominent London businessman, Thomas Wilson. It is believed Wilsons Promontory was once part of a "land bridge" connecting the mainland with Tasmania. In another age the Prom is thought to have been an island. The gradual build up of a 20 kilometre stretch of sand dunes, known as the Yanakie Isthmus, is said to have reconnected the Prom with the mainland.
The Aborigines who once lived here were members of the Boon-Oor-Rong tribe and their middens are still evident on the western side of the promontory. Long before Bass's official visit, the area was frequented by sealers and whalers. Whale bones can still be seen in the waters of Sealers and Refuge Coves on the eastern side.
In many respects it is still much the same as it was at the time of Bass's first visit. It is comprised of imposing granite mountains, sweeping plains, thick forests and some of the finest beaches in the country. These range from sheltered little coves to long surf beaches.
The Prom is the ideal place for bushwalking and a full appreciation of the magnificent array of native wildlife Australia has to offer. The friendliest are the parrots which flock around anyone offering food at Tidal River.
Tidal River is the "capital" of the Prom. It is made up of an information centre, museum, caravan and camping grounds with some cabins. Here you will find a cairn which acknowledges the use of the Prom as a commando training camp during World War II.

   
Where can I go in Melbourne?

Melbourne

Melbourne
Queen Victoria Market Sunday Morning
Football match at the MCG
Coffee in Brunswick St
Pizza in Lygon St
Tram to the Esplanade, St Kilda - Sunday Afternoon
Australian Tennis Open - Melbourne Park Jan

   
What are the Cities/towns of Victoria?

HARCORT

HARCORT
Harcourt was once the centre of the apple growing industry in Australia and today it still produces $30 million worth of fruit. Here you can buy fresh local apples from roadside stalls, drop into a local winery for a tasting or view the orchids and walk through the butterfly house at Skydancers cafe. Visit the nearby Oak Forest and the Koala Park atop Mt Alexander.

   
Where can I go in Victoria?

The Goldfields Art Galleries

The Goldfields Art Galleries
While the goldrush has slipped gently into history, you can still capture the optimistic spirit of its pioneers. The Goldfields region abounds in picturesque botanical gardens and impressive regional art galleries born from the optimism of the pioneers.
The Bendigo Art Gallery is outstanding. Local surgeon Neptune-Scott bequeathed his 19th century French Collection which shows Sisley, Harpignes, Courbet, Rosseau and Hortlear to the gallery. Such acts of generosity were not uncommon in these times. Many wealthy mining magnates were collectors of Australian and European Art and they would often bequeath them to the local galleries. Australian artists represented in this region include George Lambert, Rupert Bunny, Ray Crooke, Clifton Pugh and Fred Williams. The Gallery houses the largest Louis Buvelot collection in Australia.
The contents of the Ballarat Fine Art Gallery are equally impressive. A key feature is the Lindsay Gallery where works of art by Lionel Lindsay and other members of the family are on display. The only surviving item from this artistic family's house in Creswick is their sitting room which you can also see in the gallery. Paintings of Eugene Von Guerard portraying Ballarat in the 1850s and those of Waiter Withers, E. Phillips Fox and other early Australian School Painters are also on display.
At the Gallery at Castlemaine you can see Frederick McCubbin's Golden Sunlight which was donated by Dame Nellie Melba. You can also admire the works of Tom Roberts and E. Phillips Fox who underline the importance of the Heidelberg School in the development of Australian art. And that is not to mention the several Margaret Preston's you will discover here.
Collectively these three Victorian art galleries hold some of Australia's key art pieces and other works which portray early regional scenes are valuable historical references and certainly worth noting.
You will discover many outdoor works of art in both Ballarat and Bendigo which also mark the exuding confidence of the goldrush.

   
What is the history of north east of Victoria?

The Victorian goldfields

The Goldfields
VICTORIA
Just an hours drive north-west of Melbourne lie the Goldfields. With a heritage as rich as the ground on which it stood, this was once the home for tens of thousands who flocked here over a century ago in search of instant wealth. And while the goldrush has passed quietly into history, you can still capture the spirit of the pioneers in a region of ornate Victorian architecture, grand streetscapes and picturesque botanical gardens.

The Goldfields Towns and Attractions
BENDIGO
The huge amount of gold discovered at Bendigo has also left an extravagant mark, making it the most splendid mid-19th century Victorian city in Australia. When you drive through the main street of Bendigo you'll be struck by the city's obvious pride. Flamboyant in appearance, the journey down its side streets unveils even more remarkable buildings - baroque mansions, gothic cathedrals and Georgian-style homes.
Bendigo was the greatest goldfield of all in Victoria. Extending over 360 square kilometres, it comprised about 35 gold-bearing reefs with a total output of more than 22 million ounces. These riches built a grand city which is often regarded as the best-preserved example of Victorian architecture in the State - and possibly Australia. Any city in the world would be proud to boast Pall Mall and its handsome buildings.
The affluence and taste is also reflected in elegant villas such as Fortuna, the home of mine owner George Lansell. Known as the 'Quartz King', he was a larger than life goldmining entrepreneur whose shafts were always the deepest and whose enthusiasm spread and filled the city with optimism and excitement.
Humble single-fronted miners cottages now house fine art, as does the outstanding Bendigo Art Gallery. Here you are offered an insight into the European settlement in this area. The Gallery contains significant European and Australian art collections and has the largest Louis Buvelot collection in the country.
In total contrast, a large portion of Bendigo's rich heritage is due to its Chinese associations. The Chinese arrived in Bendigo in 1854 and China Town was once found in Bridge Street. Today, however, it is the Golden Dragon Museum which contains the treasure-trove of Chinese ceremonial regalia, including the dragons Loong and Sun Loong. If you visit Bendigo during the Easter break you can see the Easter Monday Chinese Procession where Sun Loong, carried by 60 people, is paraded.
The brilliant red Chinese Jess House is an equally startling find. Bright banners, sacred offerings and a variety of tiny alters are found inside. You can also see aspects of Chinese life portrayed in wax at the Dai Gum San Wax Museum.
Situated right in the heart of the city is the Central Deborah Mine shaft which passes through 17 levels to a depth of almost 400 metres. The last deep-reef mine in the area to close, it has been fully restored and is a working exhibit for the public.
Linking many of these attractions are the vintage 'talking' trams. You can listen to a taped commentary on the sights you will pass, identifying points of interest along the way. This eight kilometre tram tour starts and ends at the Central Deborah Mine.
While you are here, why not supplement your visual experience with some of the town's many gourmet pleasures. Wine connoisseurs will delight at the boutique wineries scattered throughout the hills and valleys surrounding Bendigo.
Other attractions include Bendigo Pottery, Australia's oldest pottery still in operation and Sweenies Creek Pottery. At Sandhurst Town, a short drive from Bendigo, you can relive the gold rush days in this faithfully re-created mining town.

   
What are the Cities/towns of Victoria?

Echuca

ECHUCA/MOAMA
Echuca, hub of The Murray River trade of the 1870s and 80s, remains faithfully intact 100 years on. Here you can re-live the river boat days - days when Echuca was Australia's largest inland port. Bawdy hotels, general stores crammed with supplies and the public buildings of law and order sprung up out of this frantic activity. Two hundred trading boats carrying wool, grain and red gum passed through the port every year.
Today, as then, the Port remains the true heart of Echuca. The River traffic still bustles but this time their cargo is pleasure seekers. The Port area is serviced by Murray Esplanade, a pedestrian walk flanked by fine 19th Century buildings. These have been faithfully restored so visitors can experience the sights sounds and smells of this "step back in time" community.
There is no entry fee to Murray Esplanade. Stroll past the towering red gum wharf, once a kilometre long, which still stands as a lasting monument to the Murray River's major inland port. The wharf was built on three levels to accommodate the rise and fall of the mighty Murray River and is still used to house a collection of some of the world's oldest "still operating" paddlesteamers and barges and other paraphernalia.
The Star Hotel on Murray Esplanade - now the headquarters of the Port of Echuca Authority, a souvenir shop and a Museum - is linked with the wharf by an underground tunnel which allowed the old timers to avoid the police who frequently raided the hotel looking for after hours "drinkers".
Discover the Bridge Hotel, built by the Echuca's founder Henry Hopwood in 1858, furnished in period style. It is a living monument to the many travellers who crossed the river on Hopwood's punt to quench their thirst.
A unique feature of the Esplanade is the only brothel (no longer operating) in Australia which is classified by the National Trust.
The sounds of horse drawn Cobb & Co coaches, the steam whistles of the paddlesteamers, the clang of the blacksmith's hammer and the buzz of the massive saw as it slices through the red gum logs, the laughter from the old time Movie House or the clatter of coins in the Penny Arcade are all part of the living history experience of the Port of Echuca.
At the western end of Murray Esplanade you enter Hopwood Gardens, now referred to as Paddlewheel Park, which sprawl along the river bank. This is the embarkation point for a one hour cruise aboard the PS Pride of the Murray, PS Canberra or MV Mary Ann, or for a one or two night cruise aboard the PS Emmylou which is a fully licensed floating hotel.
Visitors to Echuca can experience the river as Captain of their own "drive yourself" houseboat. The more adventurous can join a guided canoeing safari.
Echuca/Moama is the closest Murray River community to Melbourne, about 206 kilometres, and in addition to Australia's river history, it boasts magnificent sporting facilities. These include the Rich River Golf and Country Club, the first class bowling greens at the Moama bowling Club, croquet, water skiing and fishing.

   
What can I do in Ballarat?

Ballarat

, Stoney Rises, SMEATON, Phone: (03) 53 456233.
Perched on a historic 1850's sheep station, Tuki is in the heart of Victoria's Gold and Spa Country. Incorporating sheep farming, trout fishing, restaurant, conference and accommodation facilities.

   
What are the Cities/towns of Victoria?

HAMILTON

HAMILTON
Built on lava flows which date back some 4.5 million years, Hamilton is the wool capital of the world. One of the biggest attractions is the Big Wool-bales which houses a comprehensive history of the district's wool producing heritage. Many of the city's grand buildings and fine homes are a direct result of the wealth and prosperity of the wool industry.
Within an easy drive of Hamilton are the extinct volcanoes of Mt Eccles, Mt Napier and Mt Rouse. Their landscape is awe inspiring, as are the myriad of caves and lava blisters in the area.
Hamilton also has one of Victoria's best regional galleries and the Botanic Gardens are a nature lover's delight.
Sir Reginald Ansett, Australia's commercial aviation pioneer, lived in Hamilton. Today, you can step inside his relocated company hangar at the Ansett Transport Museum and be transported back to the earliest days of commercial flight.
At Hamilton you'll find the only surviving Victorian colony of the rare Eastern Barred Bandicoot , a small furry marsupial with rabbit like ears.

   
What can I do in Ballarat?

Ballarat Springmount Pottery

Springmount Pottery, Midland Hwy. CRESWICK 3363 Phone: (03) 5345 2856 Phone: (03) 5345 2856
A superb pottery gallery located in a natural bush setting, specialising in Australian ceramics, Ashware, antiques, jewellery, fine art and the famous Springmount Pottery range.

   
Where can I go in Victoria?

Tarra Bulga National Park

Just north-west of Yarram is the famous Tarra Bulga National Park.
It takes its name partly from the Aborigine Charlie Tarra who accompanied explorer Paul Edmund de Strzelecki through the area in 1840. Strzelecki's party would have perished if not for the hunting skills of Tarra.
The park is the veritable jewel in the crown of what the locals call Tarra Territory". The park is comprised of two sections - Tarra and Bulga. These lush areas of rainforest are all that remain of a great forest of trees which at one time covered all of Gippsland. Noted for their towering mountain ash and thick cover of ferns, both sections of the park are linked by the Grand Ridge Road.
The Park has plenty of walking tracks, a picnic area and a host of wildlife, including the remarkable lyrebird.

   
What can I do in Ballarat?

Ballarat

The Golden City Paddle Steamer, PO Box 64, BALLARAT 3350, Phone: (03) 53 311556.
Idyllic cruise on the 110 year old Golden City Paddle Steamer around beautiful Lake Wendouree Ballarat.

   
What can I do in Ballarat?

Ballarat

Ballarat
Kryal Castle, Forbes Rd, WARRENHEIP 3351, Phone: (03) 53 347388, Fax: (03) 5334 7422.
Step back into medieval history at Kryal Castle. Featuring live re-enactments daily, The Magic Theatre, arms and armour, glass craftsman, art gallery, Heraldry, royal photographer, maze, Comical cemetery, and extensive historic displays, licensed tavern, eatery and all facilities.

   
What are the Cities/towns of Victoria?

STAWELL

STAWELL
Stawell was founded on gold in 1853 when William McLachlan, a shepherd on Dr. John Blundell's station found gold there. Gold mining ceased in 1920 when the Union Quartz Mining Company closed. However in 1984 the Stawell Joint Venture re-opened the mines around Stawell and are part of Australian Goldmines. You can visit the mines and view the massive trucks and excavators.
The town is noted for the Stawell Easter Gift foot race, the richest event of its kind in the world. The first meeting was in 1877. At the Hall of Fame Museum you can see the photographs, memorabilia and equipment which highlight the history of this famous sports meeting.
Just south of Stawell is Bunjil's Shelter, one of Victoria's most important Koorie art sites.

   
What can I do in Ballarat?

Ballarat Vintage Tramway and Museum

Ballarat Vintage Tramway and Museum, South Garden Reserve, BALLARAT 3350,
Phone: (03) 53 341580.

   
What are the Cities/towns of Victoria?

KORUMBURRA

KORUMBURRA
Korumburra is a similar distance from Melbourne and was likewise established because of coal. Black coal was first uncovered here in 1872 and by 1889 the Coal Creek Mine was producing the first commercially-viable coal in the state.
Today, on the original site of this mine, is the Coal Creek Historical Village, which features a recreation of a coal mining town of the 1890s. Coal Creek has established itself as one of Gippsland's major tourism destinations and is conveniently located on the South Gippsland Highway.

   
What are the Cities/towns of Victoria?

YACKANDANDAH

YACKANDANDAH
In the heart of the beautiful North East, where cattle graze in the lush valleys of the Kiewa River and its tributaries and trout abound in crystal clear streams. Cold! That was the catch cry that first attracted people to our majestic valleys. Take a 4wd adventure into the many goldfields with history dating back to the 1850's, see the relics of a bygone era come to life before your eyes. Step into the folds of the nearby ranges, into a world where bushwalking, fossicking, horseriding , native birds and animals in abundance attract those with a love of our unique country.
Wander along the main street of Yackandandah with its old shopfronts. beautiful trees and old village atmosphere. where you will find quality crafts. souvenirs and meals to tempt your tastebuds and country hospitality you did not dream still existed in this day and age. Stay in cosy country pubs, where you can quench your thirst on warm sunfilled days. Or maybe you prefer a friendly bed and breakfast or a hostfarm experience. Our caravan parks are the best you'll find. Take your choice of easy excursions around the region - snowfields, water-skiing. wineries architecture, breathtaking scenic drives. Come and see for yourselves the beauty we have to offer you, where the gold remains. in the fiery colours of autumn in the warm summer sun. Turn your back on the 1990's, step into the peace and tranquillity of the historic shire of Yackandandah

   
What can I do in Ballarat?

Ballarat

Gold Museum, Bradshaw St, BALLARAT 3350, Phone: (03) 53 311944.
The Gold Museum houses an extensive and valuable collection of gold nuggets, alluvial deposits, gold ornaments and coins, featuring the renowned Jessica and Paul Simon collection of gold coins

   
Where can I go in Victoria?

CLUNES/TALBOT

CLUNES/TALBOT
Clunes and Talbot remain shadows of their former selves. At Clunes you can see some fine old buildings and an historical museum. Today the streets of Talbot are quiet, save the occasional 'old timer' leaning against a gate post of an old cottage.

   
What can I do in Victoria?

CASTLEMAINE

CASTLEMAINE
Within a year of gold being discovered, the population in Castlemaine soared to 25,000. Today it stands at a humble 7300. The famous Castlemaine Market Place became a distribution point for food to all central Victoria goldfields. It is now a museum and well worth seeing.
There's something for everyone in Castlemaine. Lovers of architecture, fine arts and history, photographers, field naturalists and families all find something to delight them.
Spend some time looking at the fabulous architectural gems which remind us of the boom mining town this once was. Wander through the garden and house of Buda, once the home of a noted goldfields silversmith. Take time to view one of the finest regional art galleries in Victoria.
Visit the Castlemaine Gaol or take a walk through the wonderful Botanical Gardens. You might even stop for a picnic.
The gardens, private and public, are superb, particularly in Spring and Autumn when the wildflowers are spectacular.
If you are feeling a bit more energetic why not make use of some of the excellent sporting facilities for a game of tennis, golfer bowls. Try a spot of fishing or visit a local football match.
Follow one of the many marked walking tracks or head bush yourself. Bring your bike and enjoy one of the day rides.

   
Where is Ballarat/

Ballarat Wildlife & Reptile Park

Ballarat Wildlife & Reptile Park, Cnr Fussell & York St, BALLARAT EAST 3350, Phone: (03) 53 335933.
Set in 16 acres of beautiful peppermint gum woodland, you can experience close contact with koalas, kangaroos, emus and other native animals in an atmosphere of contentment and tranquillity.

   
What can I do in Victoria?

CHEWTON

CHEWTON
At Chewton visit the Dingo Farm, wander down the winding village street, or throw a line in at the Expedition Pass Reservoir. Take time to view the Wattle Gully Gold Mine which is still operating from the 1850s.

   
What are the Cities/towns of Victoria?

FOSTER

FOSTER
Further down the South Gippsland Highway is the pretty former gold mining town of Foster. On the way in you will be rewarded with great views of Wilsons Promontory and Corner Inlet. Gold was discovered at Foster in 1870 by a group of timber cutters. While the finds were never as rich as those elsewhere in Victoria, goldmining continued through till the 1930s.

   
What are the Cities/towns of Victoria?

BENDIGO

BENDIGO
The huge amount of gold discovered at Bendigo has also left an extravagant mark, making it the most splendid mid-19th century Victorian city in Australia. When you drive through the main street of Bendigo you'll be struck by the city's obvious pride. Flamboyant in appearance, the journey down its side streets unveils even more remarkable buildings - baroque mansions, gothic cathedrals and Georgian-style homes.

   
What are the Cities/towns of Victoria?

WONTHAGGI

WONTHAGGI
A 90-minute journey down the South Gippsland and Bass Highways brings you to the former coal mining town of Wonthaggi. The mines operated here from 1909 till 1968 and, if it were not for coal, the town would not have existed.
The only mine now in operation is for tourists. Known as the State Coal Mine it was reopened in 1982 for the making of the film, "Strikebound". Former miners take regular tours underground and show the difficult conditions in which they once worked.

   
What are the physical aspects of Victoria?

Cultural Mix

Cultural Mix
The state's capital city is home to a diverse mix of people, reflected in the cuisine of the city. Melbourne has numerous foreign restaurants often found in sectionalised districts: Lygon street for Italian, Little Bourke Street for Chinese, Lonsdale Street for Greek, Victoria Street for Vietnamese, Sydney Road for Turkish and Middle Eastern, and Acland Street for Central European. Brunswick Street in the trendy suburb of Fitzroy is a good choice if you haven't identified your craving and want a range of tastes from which to choose. St Kilda is the seaside hot spot with plenty of restaurants, cafés, bars and nightclubs just off the beach. You might want to head for Queen Victoria Market which has over 1,000 stalls selling a wide variety of edibles. The historic buildings, delightful food smells and crowds combine with plenty of atmosphere.
Chinatown, developed when Chinese prospectors joined the gold rush in the 1850s, survives as a flourishing Chinese community with an abundance of often excellent Chinese restaurants and supermarkets. You can see the story of Chinese contribution to Australia at the Museum of Chinese Australian History.

   
What are the Cities/towns of Victoria?

ERICA

ERICA
Not far from Walhalla is Erica, an historic timber town, where you will see old wooden timber trestle bridges, tram lines and mill sites. The local hotel has an extensive display of artefacts while the railway museum traces the history of the Moe to Walhalla line which closed in 1954. Efforts are underway to restore part of the line for tourists.

   
What are the Cities/towns of Victoria?

RAWSON

RAWSON
The township of Rawson was established for workers constructing the giant Thomson Dam which was completed in 1983. This dam supplies water to Melbourne and is an ideal place for picnics. The dam is fed by the magnificent Thomson River which has established itself as an excellent venue for whitewater rafting, canoeing and trout fishing.

   
Where can I go in Victoria?

Albury/Wodonga

ALBURY/WODONGA
Albury/Wodonga is the ideal spot to enjoy the surrounding countryside, visit the upper reaches of the Murray near Corryong, fish the streams and the dams, or sail or waterski on Lake Hume. There are also international standard golf courses and lawn bowls to keep visitors entertained.
The PS Cumberoona takes visitors on a leisurely trip along the Murray and there are plenty of shady picnic spots along the banks.

   
What are the Cities/towns of Victoria?

LEONGATHA

LEONGATHA
A 10-minute drive from Korumburra is the thriving farming town of Leongatha, home of the biggest dairy factory in the southern hemisphere. Leongatha was once the home of a labour colony, a settlement of unemployed men who cleared and farmed the area after the completion of the South Gippsland railway in the 1890s.

   
What are the Cities/towns of Victoria?

BAIRNSDALE

BAIRNSDALE
Bairnsdale is a neat and charming town found on the banks of the Mitchell River, between Sale and Lakes Entrance on the Princes Highway. Both Sale and Bairnsdale put the visitor in easy rich of the high country to the north. Most notable this means the Alpine National Park, the Avon Wilderness Area and the Mitchell River National Park. An ideal destination is the Den of Nargun, a ferny grotto in the Mitchell River National Park which is popular for picnics and bushwalking.

   
What can I do in Ballarat?

Ballarat

Suga - Ballarat Candy Kitchen, 109 Sturt Street, Ballarat. Vic 3350, Phone: (03) 5333 4566, Fax: (03) 5333 4577
The Candy makers make the rock behind the glass partitions allowing full visibility whilst providing information about the process. Once the candy has been stretched and cut, it is offered to the audience whilst still warm. The taste of the fresh candy is sensational and the power of performance very strong.

   
What are the Cities/towns of Victoria?

MAFFRA

MAFFRA
Just to the north west of Sale is the charming town of Maffra where the annual Gippsland Harvest Festival is staged at the Powerscourt Country House. This celebrates the produce provided by the rich fertile flood plains. Noted restaurants, vignerons and artists are represented on one of the most important days on Central Gippsland's calender.

   
What can I do in Ballarat?

Ballarat

Yuulong Lavender Estate, Yendon Rd, MT EGERTON 3345, Phone: (03) 53 689453.
The property features a retail nursery, craft and tearoom complex, picturesque bushland setting, large garden, contoured hills of lavender, bi annual music and farming festivals, and an extensive range of lavender culinary, craft, and skin care products.

   
What are the physical aspects of Victoria?

Melbourne

Melbourne
Australia's second city is a place of contradictions and hidden charms. Melbourne is the cultivated sister of brassy Sydney and the cultural capital of the continent. Here we have a hot pot of European and Asian influences stronger than in any other Australian city. Along the southern coastline Outside the city we can watch the sundown race of fairy penguins on Phillip Island, drive along the sculpted South Ocean coastline, sample some of the country's tasty wine in and around charming Victorian towns, or bushwalk in a splendid variety of national parks. Visitors come for its shopping, restaurants, nightlife and sporting calendar, encouraging many Melburnians to believe that they live in one of the most civilised cities in the world. And yes, Melbourne did win the title as 'the most liveable city in the world'.

   
What are the Cities/towns of Victoria?

ARARAT

ARARAT
Ararat, to the east, is the commercial centre of a prosperous wine growing and farming region. A former gold mining town, Ararat is home to many historical buildings including an impressive bluestone Post Office, Town Hall, Civic Square and War Memorial. The notorious J Ward which housed the criminally insane for over 100 years is a grim relic of the past, and open to the public. Ararat's picturesque Alexandra Gardens are renowned for their orchid glasshouses.

   
What can I do in Ballarat?

Ballarat

Blood on the Southern Cross , Bradshaw St, BALLARAT 3350, Phone: (03) 53 335777
Australia's Eureka lives on in Blood on the Southern Cross, a dramatic sound-and-light show which tells the story of the Eureka Rebellion in which Ballarat's miners took up arms against the colonial administration on the Ballarat goldfields in December 1854.

   
What can I do in Victoria?

CORNER INLET Duck Point Walk

CORNER INLET Duck Point Walk - Commencing on Foley Road, this trail leads through thickets of Coastal Tea-tree to the sheltered waters of Corner Inlet. Scenic views across the Inlet to the peaks of Wilsons Promontory are the feature of this walk. Distance 800 metres/30min return Shellcot Road - enter reserve area marked 'Red Bluff' and follow track to beach. It is very pleasant to walk in either direction, but to the right you will see the 'Red Bluff' jutting out. ('Red Bluff' is formed out of a very reddish clay) This is a very tidal area. Bluff Road - Follow a very bushy track down to the boat sheds. This is a mangrove area and can be quite squelchy under foot. To the left, towards 'Red Bluff', the very rare 'Yanakie Berry ' (bright red berries with very prickly leaves) can be seen in fruit in the late Autumn and early Winter. From this location enjoy the wonderful views over the Inlet Be aware that this is a tidal area, and even at low tide the shoreline can be very boggy. Yanakie Landing Walk - Starting at Foley Road the track wends its way down to the rocky beach area, then back up through the Old Quarry. Distance approximately a 1.3km circuit with some steep sections. The lookout has good views of Corner Inlet and over Mt.Singapore, Mt.Vereker, Mt.Margaret, Mt.Hunter, Mt.Roundback and Chinamans Knob. Charles Hall Road - an excellent location for observing the pristine environment and habitat of many species of wading birds. This is a very fragile and significant location with its marshes and small creeks, so tread gently.

   
What are the Cities/towns of Victoria?

BASS

BASS
At the town of Bass on the Bass Highway, you'll discover the extraordinary Wildlife Wonderland. This has four different areas depicting Australian wildlife - the giant worm attraction, wombat world, kangaroo enclosure and a farm yard featuring cows, sheep, goats and a host of other animals. Wildlife Wonderland allows visitors to have hands-on contact with some of Australia's most treasured animals.

   
What can I do in Victoria?

CORNER INLET Duck Point Walk

CORNER INLET Duck Point Walk - Commencing on Foley Road, this trail leads through thickets of Coastal Tea-tree to the sheltered waters of Corner Inlet. Scenic views across the Inlet to the peaks of Wilsons Promontory are the feature of this walk. Distance 800 metres/30min return Shellcot Road - enter reserve area marked 'Red Bluff' and follow track to beach. It is very pleasant to walk in either direction, but to the right you will see the 'Red Bluff' jutting out. ('Red Bluff' is formed out of a very reddish clay) This is a very tidal area. Bluff Road - Follow a very bushy track down to the boat sheds. This is a mangrove area and can be quite squelchy under foot. To the left, towards 'Red Bluff', the very rare 'Yanakie Berry ' (bright red berries with very prickly leaves) can be seen in fruit in the late Autumn and early Winter. From this location enjoy the wonderful views over the Inlet Be aware that this is a tidal area, and even at low tide the shoreline can be very boggy. Yanakie Landing Walk - Starting at Foley Road the track wends its way down to the rocky beach area, then back up through the Old Quarry. Distance approximately a 1.3km circuit with some steep sections. The lookout has good views of Corner Inlet and over Mt.Singapore, Mt.Vereker, Mt.Margaret, Mt.Hunter, Mt.Roundback and Chinamans Knob. Charles Hall Road - an excellent location for observing the pristine environment and habitat of many species of wading birds. This is a very fragile and significant location with its marshes and small creeks, so tread gently.

   
What are the Cities/towns of Victoria?

BEECHWORTH

BEECHWORTH
To visit Beechworth is to step back into history. Once the centre of one of the biggest goldfields in Victoria, its solid granite and dignified brick buildings are beautifully preserved. This is the real attraction of Beechworth. It is a living and working town, proud of its history, its buildings and its stories.
There are magnificent buildings here. Some twenty- five of them are listed on the Victorian Historic Buildings Council Register. They reflect the fortunes that were made - and spent - during the gold rush days.

   
What can I do in Ballarat?

Ballarat

Ballarat Aviation Museum, Municipal Airport, BALLARAT 3350, Phone: (03) 53 395016.
Ballarat Exhibition & Entertainment Centre, Western Highway, BALLARAT, Vic. 3350 Phone: (03) 53 347877

   
What can I do in Ballarat?

Ballarat

The Tangled Maze, The Old Kingston Rd., CRESWICK 3363, Phone: (03) 53 452847.
The Tangled Maze is constructed from hundreds of flowering plants, grown on trellises to provide the traditional puzzle......where the trick is to find your way through, and also to answer the questions of the mystery trail.

   
What can I do in Ballarat?

Ballarat

Sovereign Hill, Bradshaw St, BALLARAT 3350, Phone: (03) 53 311944.
Sovereign Hill faithfully depicts Ballarat's first ten years after the discovery of gold in 1851. It's where Australia's history comes to life! At Sovereign Hill, you'll experience life as it was in the 1850s. It's just like stepping back in time.

   
What can I do in Ballarat?

Ballarat

Eureka Stockade, Eureka St, BALLARAT , Phone:(03) 53 331854.
Located on one of Australia's most historic streets,the Stockade is the location of the newly built Eureka Stockade centre which employs state-of-the-art multi-media technology to vividly bring the Eureka story to life.

   
What can I do in Ballarat?

The Ballarat Vintage Tramway

The Ballarat Vintage Tramway is operated by the Ballarat Tramway Museum Inc., formed to keep alive the tramway experience that has otherwise disappeared from the streets of Ballarat.

The Museum's members are volunteers from all walks of life. They spend their own time operating and maintaining the tramway. The 1.3 kilometre track is located in the Botanical Gardens, on the western shore of Lake Wendouree. It was part of the former tramway system which commenced running in 1887 as a horse tramway. The horse tramway was taken over by another company which extended and electrified the routes in 1905. The lines were closed during 1970 and 1971.

The Museum is one of a couple of purely volunteer group in the world operating tramcars in a public road and over a section of original track.

At the depot there is a museum display of photographs and tramway memorabilia for visitors. The tramcar fleet and workshops area can also be inspected.

The rolling stock includes Ballarat Horse Tram No. 1 and ten tramcars which initially ran in Melbourne between 1913 and 1951, plus two acquired directly from Melbourne by the Museum in 1975.

   
What are the Cities/towns of Victoria?

CHILTERN

CHILTERN
Spend a day and stay the night - a visit to the colonial township of Chiltern is a must. Step back in time to a town untouched by the fast pace of today's living, a town full of history, presenting itself as it was in the gold rush days. You can spend days visiting the three National Trust properties, museums, enticing antiques, art and craft or bric-a-brac shops, where you will find many bargains. Tempt your taste buds at the restaurants and eating places, meet the lovable Alpacas a the Alpaca Farm on your way to the beautiful Chiltern State park. Chiltern is a town which holds something of interest for everyone, and is central to Albury/Wodonga, Wangaratta, Beechworth, Yackandandah, Rutherglen and Corowa.

   
What is Ballarat?

Ballarat Rail

Ballarat Rail Promotion Group, Box 1022 Ballarat Mail Centre Vic 3354 Phone: (03) 5331 1717
The Ballarat Rail Promotion Group (BRPG) is a volunteer, incorporated association working to ensure the preservation of the unique heritage of the Ballarat railway precinct.

   
What are the Cities/towns of Victoria?

HORSHAM

HORSHAM
To the north of The Grampians is Horsham, set on the banks of the beautiful Wimmera River. The unofficial capital of the Wimmera, Horsham services the needs of the wheat and livestock farmers of the region and offers the visitor city living, country style.
The Wool Factory in Horsham produces some of the best fine wool in Australia while the Regional Art Gallery houses the magnificent collection which includes significant works by Hans Heysen, George Lambert and Charles Bush.
For the sports minded there are plenty of activities - bushwalking, rockclimbing, abseiling, orienteering, boating, canoeing, hunting, cycling, trail bike riding or four wheel driving.
The nearby lakes and waterways are perfect for fishing and even if you're not having much luck you can still enjoy distant views of The Grampians. West from Horsham is Mount Arapiles where climbers from around the world pit their skills against the thousands of climbs available. For the ultimate scenic view of Horsham why not go up in a hot air balloon or on a glider flight?

   
What can I do in Victoria?

Phillip Island Penguins

Phillip Island Penguins

Suddenly a voice cries: "Look! Over there!" Necks crane, eyes strain hard to see. But in the gentle surf at sunset it is impossible to recognise what it is in the water. A head, a beak perhaps, a tiny wing...

No sooner is the first cry heard when it is followed by another. You look out to sea and, yes, there's something there, some movement, something ... and suddenly not just one by many...

And a hush of expectancy falls.

They come as if riding on the surf, and you can pick them out now.

And they're coming home

On a patch of sand not too far away you now glimpse a pair of wobbly feet. You can see the bird then, a tiny bird, a litle penguin, a fairy penguin.

Another comes on shore, and another, and another, and soon the beach is alive with these birds.

They have had their day foraging out at sea and now they are coming home.

They walk across the sand in small groups (some almost in single file), as if in a triumphant march, and they head for their home in the dunes.

An awesome sight to see

Wave after wave they come from the sea and waddle, like only penguins can, across the sand of Summerland Beach on Phillip Island.

They arrive in their hundreds, these tiny, frail-looking birds who've braved the seas, and are now coming home.

They are an awesome sight to see, this massive avian display before the dark finally swallows the sea and earth and sky.

And you pray for Someone, please, Someone, please look after these tiny brave ocean explorers and see that they come home, always, to their home on the shore.

   
What are the Cities/towns of Victoria?

PORT ALBERT

PORT ALBERT
Nearby is the historic Port Albert, discovered in 1841 by Angus McMillan. It is Victoria's oldest seaport and the first settlement in Gippsland. Its size belies the major role it played in the opening up of the whole region. McMillan happened upon Port Albert during his search for a southern port through which to ship livestock between New South Wales and Van Diemen's Land.
Throughout the 1840s more settlers arrived , gradually shipping, banking, stock and other businesses were established.
When gold was discovered at Walhalla and Omeo, Port Albert became a shipping point for something other than cattle. Its relevance as a transport hub began to decline following the establishment of the South Gippsland rail line in the 1890s.
A walk through Port Albert will reveal some 12 historic buildings all with plaques affixed.
Today the town is best known for fishing. It provides access not only to Bass Strait but to 220 square kilometres of sheltered estuaries. Catches include flathead, snapper, king george whiting, bream, salmon, perch and mulloway.

   
What are the Cities/towns of Victoria?

INVERLOCH

INVERLOCH
Inverloch was one of the state's first seaports and much of the first coal mined in Wonthaggi was shipped to Melbourne from here. The township is found at the mouth of Anderson's Inlet and it is best known for its beaches. The coastal drive between Cape Paterson and Inverloch is a must. It tracks along the narrow Bunurong Cliff Coastal Park. Look out for Eagles Nest - a peculiar rock formation which has long been a prominent landmark.

   
What are the Cities/towns of Victoria?

HALLS GAP

HALLS GAP
In 1841, when the early squatter CB Hall followed the path made by the Koorie people into the gap, he had no idea where it would lead. Today, nestled between the Mount Difficult and Mount William Ranges, Halls Gap is the bustling village named after him. There are shops and restaurants, places to camp and motels and guest houses in which to stay. High in the trees around this friendly, relaxed township, koalas can still be found sleeping in the forks of the manna gums. And their grunts are a telltale sign of their presence in trees along some walking tracks.
This can be followed by a visit to the Brambuk Living Cultural Centre, just two kilometres from Halls Gap. The Centre brings to life the rich history and culture of the Koorie communities of the Wimmera and south west Victoria.

   
Where is Albury/Wodonga?

Albury

Albury's Regional Art Gallery is worth a visit, and the cities have an excellent array of theatre, clubs and restaurants. A wide range of local produce is available for sampling including cheese, trout, jams, yabbies and nuts. And, of course, there are the local wines.

   
What are the Cities/towns of Victoria?

YARRAM

YARRAM
Rejoining the South Gippsland Highway and travelling east you will happen upon the town of Yarram, formerly the site of low-lying swamplands.
John Carpenter, an early pioneer, established a flour mill and a saw mill in the area in 1857.

   
Where can I go in Victoria?

Historic Montrose Cottage & Eureka Museum

Historic Montrose Cottage & Eureka Museum, 111 Eureka St, BALLARAT 3350, Phone/Fax: (03) 53 322554.
This tiny but beautifully proportioned cottage provides a window into the life of a middle class, Scottish family on the Ballarat Goldfields at the time of the Eureka Rebellion. Includes Montrose Cottage, Eureka Museum, Gift Shop and Tearooms

   
What can I do in Victoria?

The Grampians

The Grampians
VICTORIA
There's a place in Victoria where time seems to have stood still. A place of dreamtime legends. Where you can see and experience one of the greatest national parks in Australia. Stay a while. Experience this place the Koories call Gariwerd. A place you've known as The Grampians.
Even from a distance you're struck by the way the mountains rise up abruptly from the flat plains below. It is the most western point, the grand finale of the Great Dividing Range, which runs down the coastline of eastern Australia.
As you get closer, the massive rock outcrops and deep gorges become more apparent. The exposed faces, carved and engraved by millions of years of wind and rain, create a unique natural backdrop to the surrounding bush.

   
Where can I go in Victoria?

Beechworth

For those interested in history Beechworth is literally a goldmine, it is registered by the National Trust as a Historic Town .
White man first settled here in 1839. Gold was first found here in 1852 when Beechworth quickly became one of Australia's richest gold fields, yielding 4,121,918 ounces in the first 10 years. The Chinese played a large part in the growth of the area introducing vegetable and tobacco growing. As the Chinese outnumbered the European by five to one there was always tension leading to the rioting Buckland Valley. A less savoury part of our history the Chinese were bashed, robbed and killed. The Chinese burning towers, and hundreds of graves, are a sad reminder of the hard life and difficult times faced by the early Australians.
There are magnificent buildings, some twenty-five of them are listed on the Victorian Historic Buildings Council Register. They truly reflect the fortunes that were made - and spent - during the gold rush days.
Beechworth is in the heart of the Kelly Country, both Ned and his mother were caught and spent time in Beechworth Goal. Stand in the dock of the Court House on the spot where Ned Kelly was arraigned before being sent to Melbourne.
The fine granite facade is all that remains of the original Oven's District Hospital, dating back to 1856, once the largest between Sydney and Melbourne.
GEOGRAPHY
Beechworth is nestled in the foothills of the Australian Alps. It is a thriving country town with central location to the snowfields and a wealth of the district's features and attractions.
ACCOMMODATION
Accommodation in Beechworth caters to all tastes and budgets. From Motels, Hotels, Guest Houses and Caravan Parks, also catering for back-packers and family and group accommodation a speciality.
TRAVEL

Only a 30 minute drive from either Wodonga or Wangaratta. By car, Beechworth is 3 1/2 hours drive north of Melbourne and 6 1/2 hours south of Sydney along the Hume Highway.
SIGHTS
Beechworth is alive with activity, there are bric-a-brac and many art & craft galleries, antique and unique speciality shops.
The Beechworth Stage Coach, offers a unique way to visit the Town and Panoramic Gorge Tours, Day Trips & Picnics.
Or tour the town on foot and enjoy the local walks, information and maps providing guidance on the many historic sites and relics from a golden past are available most places.
TOURING
The country around Beechworth is full of reminders of the gold rushes.
Beechworth is not just a well preserved old gold town it is a thriving country town whose central location to the snowfields, and the wealth of the district's features and attractions, make it an ideal base from which to explore North East Victoria.
ENTERTAINMENT
Stay a while and dine in the fine restaurants, coffee shops or gourmet deli's or just enjoy the daily fresh delicacies of the Beechworth Bakery.
ANNUAL FESTIVALS
Drive back in Time - Feb
Golden Horseshoes - Easter
Harvest Festival - May
Garden Heritage Festival - Nov

   
What are the Cities/towns of Victoria?

SALE

SALE
Sale is the biggest centre in the area and it is here that you can view the acclaimed textile art of the famous wildlife artist Annemieke Mein. A key source of her inspiration is the wetlands of the Sale Common. For thousands of years this labyrinth of marshes, rivers and lakes has provided a haven for a vast range of wildlife.
Sale is just a 20 minute drive from the famous 90-Mile Beach, the slender strip of coast which helps separate the remarkable Gippsland Lakes from the ocean. These are comprised of three lakes - King, Victoria and Wellington. These lakes are fed by four navigable rivers - Latrobe, Mitchell, Nicholson and Tambo.
The Lakes incorporate picturesque resorts such as Paynesville, Metung, Loch Sport, Rotamah Island, Golden Beach and Seaspray. Sufficiently protected from the ocean winds, and without any rocks to contend with, the Gippsland Lakes provide an ideal boating venue for cruisers, yachts and small craft.
To a large degree the area is very much as it was when explorer Angus McMillan visited here in the 1840s and this is mainly due to the establishment of national parks covering almost 20,000 hectares.

   
What are the Cities/towns of Victoria?

MALDON

MALDON
The township of Maldon was christened The Best Preserved Town in Australia of the Gold Mining Era' by the National Trust because of its authenticity and its preservation is encouraged. Cottage gardens, pavements overhung by verandahs and old mining structures are the essence of Maldon. The place really comes to life on weekends with horse-drawn rides around town and steam train rides over a section of restored track.

   
What can I do in Victoria?

MOLIAGUL

MOLIAGUL
Who can forget Moliagul? This is where the world's largest nugget was unearthed in 1869. Weighing 65 kilograms it became affectionately known as The Welcome Stranger'. The descendants of one of the lucky miners who discovered it, John Deason, are well known in the district today.

   
Where can I go in Victoria?

Melbourne

Melbourne, city (1991 pop. 2,761,995), capital of Victoria, SE Australia, on Port Phillip Bay at the mouth of the Yarra River. Melbourne, Australia's second largest city, is a rail and air hub and financial and commercial center. Wool and raw and processed agricultural goods are exported. The city is heavily industrialized; industries include shipbuilding and the manufacture of farm machinery, textiles, and electrical goods. Included in the Melbourne urban agglomeration are many coastal resorts.
Settled in 1835, it was named (1837) for Lord Melbourne, the British prime minister. From 1901 to 1927 the city was the seat of the Australian federal government. Melbourne has campuses of several universities, including the Univ. of Melbourne (1853), Monash Univ. (1958), and La Trobe Univ. (1964). Melbourne Technical College, the Australian Ballet School, the National Gallery, and the Victorian Arts Centre are also in the city. Melbourne is the seat of Roman Catholic and Anglican archbishops. The botanical gardens are a notable attraction. The Melbourne Cup Race is run annually at the Flemington Racecourse, and the city hosts a Formula One Grand Prix race. Melbourne was the site of the 1956 summer Olympic games.

   
Where can I go in Victoria?

The Goldfields

The Goldfields
VICTORIA
Just an hours drive north-west of Melbourne lie the Goldfields. With a heritage as rich as the ground on which it stood, this was once the home for tens of thousands who flocked here over a century ago in search of instant wealth. And while the goldrush has passed quietly into history, you can still capture the spirit of the pioneers in a region of ornate Victorian architecture, grand streetscapes and picturesque botanical gardens.

   
What are the Cities/towns of Victoria?

WALHALLA

WALHALLA
Not far north of the Latrobe Valley and nestled in the foothills of the Great Dividing Range, the Mountain Rivers District provides a beautiful combination of history and nature.
Here you will find the magnificent former goldmining town of Walhalla. It's almost as if it has been snap frozen in time. Not many people live at Walhalla but many of its original buildings remain.
These include the fire station, museum, post office, Windsor House, Mechanics Institute, bank vault Freemason's Lodge, St John's Church of England and, possibly the most photographed thing in Walhalla, the grand old band rotunda.
During the 1880s Walhalla was one of the state's richest goldfields. The Long Tunnel Extended Mine, which operated from 1871 until 1911, yielded 8 15,568 ounces of gold and paid dividends of $2.5 million.
The hilly terrain meant local sports fans had to virtually cut the top off a mountain in order to establish a sports field for football and cricket. The climb to the top was so arduous that local sportsmen would ascend the day before and camp overnight.

   
What can I do in Victoria?

LATROBE VALLEY

LATROBE VALLEY Supplying about 85 per cent of Victoria's power, the Latrobe Valley has long been regarded as the state's "engine room" and contains three major cities - Morwell, Moe and Traralgon.
Begining at the town of Yarragon, the Princes Highway plots the extent of the Latrobe Valley to its end just east of Traralgon. "The Valley", as it's called by its residents, is home to the State Electricity Commission's giant open cut coal mine and its extensive power generation plants. Regular free tours are conducted of the Morwell Open Cut and Hazlewood Power Station.
This area is sports mad as two top class racecourses (Moe and Traralgon) and four I8-hole golf courses help testify.
The Latrobe Valley boasts about 40 a la carte restaurants, more than 30 hotels/motels, extensive convention facilities and a good range of caravan and camping grounds.
The Valley puts the visitor within striking distance of some magnificent country such as that found at the Tarra-Bulga, Baw Baw, and Morwell National Parks, and at the Mount Worth, Strezlecki, Moondara, Tyers and Holey Plains State Parks.
It is also only a short drive from the extraordinary former goldmining town of Walhalla.
Just 45 minutes drive north of Moe and found within the Baw Baw National Park are the excellent cross-country ski resorts of Baw Baw and Mt St Gwinear.
And, at Moe, is the Latrobe Valley's pride and joy - Old Gippstown. Found right on the Princes Highway this recreated township of more than 30 buildings is situated on 3.5 hectares of parkland. It has recaptured the life of early Gippsland through the eyes of the primary producer, the gold prospector, the retailer and the early industrialist.
At Morwell is the Latrobe Regional Gallery which has provided great support to talented local artists through both its acquisitions and exhibitions.

   
What are some places to visit in NSW?

The Great Ocean Road

The Great Ocean Road VICTORIA
Take an unforgettable journey along Victoria's Great Ocean Road, the world's most inspiring coastal drive. Follow its winding trail through the lush Otway rainforests, to the breathtaking, windswept drama of the Shipwreck Coast. For much of the way the road clings to the coastline, twisting and turning, with every bend revealing a sight more spectacular than the last. See the grand architecture where the ocean has carved mighty arches, caverns and coves from the rock. Then follow its trail past soothing estuaries and gentle bays.

   
What are the Cities/towns of Victoria?

TARNAGULLA

TARNAGULLA
Tarnagulla is the host of a rare survivor of the golden era - a theatre where diggers were once entertained by travelling performers.

   
What can I do in Ballarat?

BALLARAT

BALLARAT
Born out of the frantic days of the goldrush, Victoria's largest inland city has matured into a gracious collection of elegant public buildings, fine parks and landscaped gardens. Ballarat is situated just 110 kilometres west of Melbourne - a short hour's drive.
From its initial gold find in 1851, the area produced 27 per cent of Victoria's gold by the turn of the century. The initial fields to be exploited were the alluvial fields of Ballarat East. In the years following, the rich leads buried under the Sebastapol Plateau were to produce enormous yields. The resulting need for heavy machinery meant a growth in local industries such as Cowley's Eureka Iron Works and mining suppliers like The Phoenix. These manufacturing concerns created a permanence for Ballarat.
Not only did the Goldfields bring wealth, but along with it came turmoil. In fact, one of the greatest dramas in Australian history occurred on the Ballarat goldfields. The Eureka Stockade remains the only armed civil uprising against the government in Australia's history.
All miners on Victorian goldfields were expected to pay, in advance, a licensing fee. This aroused discontent amongst the miners who developed the slogan "no taxation without representation". On November 29, 1854, thousands of miners gathered at Bakery Hill and defiantly burnt their licenses. A few days later, after grouping together behind a stockade, they were confronted by the soldiers.
In the early hours of December 3, 22 miners and six of the attackers died in the battle. Eureka was the name of the claim in which the miners built their timber barricade.
The battle only lasted 15 minutes but the event will remain deeply engraved in Australia's history. Its outcome was the quickening of the development of democracy in Australia, the license fee was replaced by a miner's right and holders of miner's rights were given the right to vote.
Ballarat is also home to the delightful Sovereign Hill - a faithful and fascinating re-creation of an old gold mining town of the 1850s. It is located on the site of the former Sovereign Quartz Mining Company. Here you can see township bakers demonstrate colonial breadmaking, a smithy showing how horseshoes are made, an old fashioned printer producing a newspaper and pan for real gold. You can visit the mining museum and discover the process of obtaining gold from quartz. At night, the sound and light performance Blood on the Southern Cross encapsulates the Eureka story.
Opposite lies the Gold Museum where the history of this magic metal has been captured and detailed. Nearby, the Ballarat Fine Art Gallery houses early and contemporary Australian art. Here, such finely regarded artists as Eugene Von Guerard, William Dobell, Sidney Nolan and Russell Drysdale chronicle the history of early Ballarat and Australia. You can also see the Eureka Flag donated by the widow of a trooper who fought at the Eureka Stockade.
Ballarat is also known as 'the city of statues'. The Botanical Gardens have a fine classical collection donated by gold mining entrepreneurs. The Flight From Pompeii, and Spring. Autumn, Winter, Hebe, Leda and Pomona grace these gardens. The Prime Ministers' Avenue is updated with a new bust to record each incoming Prime Minister of Australia.
While you are here make sure you visit the magnificent Craig's Royal Hotel. Mark Twain and Prince Alfred once slept here. Today you can enjoy its colonial authenticity, as you can at Ballarat Terrace where gracious accommodation is offered in the renovated Victorian terrace home. Surrounding Ballarat are further attractions like the famous Yellowglen Vineyards. Don't miss the Wallace Cheesery and the Yuulong Lavender Estate.

   
Where can I go in Victoria?

The Goldfields Botanical Gardens

The Goldfields Botanical Gardens
In Ballarat a Scotsman, Thomas Stoddart, donated 12 Italian marble statues. You can see them scattered through the Botanic Gardens. Also located here is The Flight from Pompeii as is the Robert Burns statue, one of Ballarat's landmarks. The stately streetscape of Pall Mall in Bendigo is introduced by the delightful ornamentation of the Alexandra Fountain, named after Alexandra, the Princess of Wales.
When tiny Malmsbury was surveyed in 1863, nine hectares were set aside for Botanical Gardens. The town received thousands of plants and seedlings propagated for distribution to State gardens by the famous botanist - Baron Ferdinand Von Mueller - the man responsible for establishing Melbourne's grand Botanic Gardens. They contain the best example of only four known specimens of the strawberry tree in cultivation in Victoria.
Nearby, at Kyneton, are the Kyneton Botanical gardens where you can see a Chilean Wine Palm, so rare it has a National Trust classification. These gardens also have a delightful collection of oak trees.
Other gardens that will delight you in the area include the Phillip Gardens, Maryborough which features a central lake that was once a dam. St Arnaud has the Queen Mary gardens, Ararat the Alexandra Gardens and Eaglehawk the Canterbury Gardens.
But the most splendid gardens in the region can be seen at Ballarat and Castlemaine.
You will see a statutory pavilion in Ballarat's botanical gardens which was built a century ago to house a collection given to the city.
Imposing trees and perfect lawns covering 40 hectares surround Lake Wendouree. Many of the trees you'll see are over 120 years old and feature on the National Trust's Register of Significant Trees. The gardens are famous for their begonias and the town hosts an annual begonia festival. Another attraction of this festival is the splendid floral carpet made from over 100,000 fresh flowers.
At the Castlemaine Gardens you can see one of the oldest known cultivated trees in Victoria - an English oak, planted by His Royal Highness Prince Alfred in 1867.

   
What can I do in Victoria?

CRESWICK

CRESWICK
It's hard to believe that tiny Creswick once had a population of 60,000. Typical of a former gold mining town, today it just tops 2700. Creswick was the scene for Australia's worst gold mining disaster. In 1882, water broke in from the already flooded Australasia No. 1 into the No. 2 mine. Twenty-two helpless miners drowned in the darkness far underground. You can read about this tragic story which is recorded in detail at the site of the mine. You can also see the old government battery which was built to crush rock for the extraction of gold. It is one of the few remaining in Australia. Creswick is also the home town of Australia's former Prime Minister, John Curtin and the famous artists, the Lindsays

   
What are the Cities/towns of Victoria?

YANAKIE

YANAKIE
Yanakie is located on the Peninsula of Wilsons Promontory, South Gippsland, and the Southernmost Landmass on the Australian Mainland. Yanakie is approximately a two hour drive from Melbourne via the South Gippsland Highway, (just follow the Wilsons Promontory signs at all times), and the last (and only) town on the peninsula before the 'Prom' National Park gate. The village is situated in a rural location, overlooking rolling farmland, and is only a few minutes drive to beaches (Corner Inlet & Shallow Inlet) on either side of the Peninsula. This is a great destination for those interested in discovering the majestic beauty of the Southern Coastlines, Inlets and bays; access to the giant timbers, the ferny valleys and water falls of the Strzelecki Ranges.
 Village Services - The Yanakie Licensed General Store, fuel outlet and Yanakie House & Gallery Café.
Local attractions & services - Milparinkis Yabbie farm and Tingara View Tea Room
 B&B and Self Contained accommodation providers.
 Two caravan parks on either side of the peninsula
 Boat launching facilities Population - in village 12 people (increasing in season) and in the whole peninsula region - 261 people (varies seasonally)
 On the Meeniyan - Promontory Road in South Gippsland, 185 Kms from the GPO in Melbourne. 8 Kms from the National Park gate, travelling time approx 5 mins, and 30 minutes to Tidal River.
 The main town is Foster, 28 Kms to the north, a 20 minutes drive
 Surrounded on two sides by Inlets (Corner & Shallow Inlets), 5 minutes drive either way.
 Local tennis courts & children's playground.
 Fishing, boating, swimming, windsurfing and bushwalking.
 A great base for the artist, photographer, fisherman, Prom enthusiast, or weary traveller.

HISTORY 'YANAKIE (yan-a-key) - a Koori name from the Gunai (Kurnai) language interpreted generally as 'between waters' - More than 12,000 years ago, when the sea level was six metres higher than at present, 'The Prom' was a group of islands with only the mountain tips showing above water level. When the sea level dropped, (to form the land bridge to Tasmania), a series of sand dunes formed over a basalt base creating the Yanakie Peninsula. This constructed a link between the previous islands and the mainland, so that when the sea level rose again, it thus formed what is now the present day Wilsons Promontory.
Wilsons Promontory was first travelled by the Koories (as south-eastern Australian Aboriginals prefer to call themselves). These people were the Gunai (Kurnai) community with the Brataualung clan occupying the surrounding areas of South Gippsland. To the Koories, Wilsons Promontory is known as 'Wamoon', (also known as Yirik or Woomom), watched over by their spirit ancestor, 'Loo-errn'. These people had been spending at least part of their year on the Yanakie Peninsula for approximately 6500 years prior to the arrival of George Bass in 1798.
Originally, in the shire of South Gippsland, Yanakie was one of the parishes in the County of Buln-Buln on Wilsons Promontory, along with the other parishes - Beek-Beek, Warreen, Kulk and Tallang. The northern section of Yanakie was probably exempted from the National Park (declared in 1905 - internal section only, 1908 - the coastline, and in the 1950's - the Yanakie southern section) on the grounds of revenue. A lease had been granted in 1852 for the Yanakie Station or Run (a profitable business), which originally grazed cattle through to Darby River. Yanakie has only been developed into dairying country since the 1950's... Prior to development, Yanakie (also called the Yanakie Common) was open heathy plains with the 'Red Swamp', 'White Swamp and 'Black Swamps', supporting vast birdlife including the black swans and brolgas. It is interesting to note that very few of these original Koori (aboriginal) parish names exist on the National Park today…

Since the time of European discovery, exploitation has vastly changed some of the land and the surrounding sea. One record of the extent of this is the impact on seal numbers - in 1804 the American ship 'Union' obtained 600,000 seal skins - today we have nowhere near this number in the whole of the southern Australian waters. When this industry collapsed they turned their attention towards harvesting the oil of muttonbirds (short-tailed Shearwaters), and whaling. (Local timber was used for fuel to boil down the blubber) A timber mill was set up in Sealers Cove in 1849, but lasted only until 1858, when presumably all the accessible tall timber had been removed. (A revival of the timber milling occurred again between 1903 to 1906, with a small town comprising 16 buildings, a boarding house and a community hall existed). Pastoral leases were granted from approximately 1851 onward in Sealers Cove and the Yanakie region, with varied successes.

   
Where can I go in Victoria?

DONOLLY

DONOLLY
The town of Dunolly celebrates its historical origins during the Dunolly Gold Rush weekend each year. And so it should, being the district which has turned up more nuggets in its time than any field in Australia. A visit coinciding with these events is an experience

   
What can I do in Victoria?

Gippsland, Victoria

Gippsland
VICTORIA
Gippsland is a region which stretches eastwards, from the periphery of Melbourne, to the magnificent Lakes in the east and to the extraordinary Wilsons Promontory in the south east.
It is riddled with masses of green forests and gardens, stunning mountains, rocky rivers, picturesque towns and, to a large degree, is defined by its long sandy beaches. It was the Polish explorer Count Paul Edmond de Strzelecki who named the region after Governor Gipps.
The Princes, South Gippsland and Bass Highways provide the major access to its destinations.

   
What can I do in Victoria?

Victoria Physical

AREA: 227,600 sq. km, POPULATION: 3,500,000
CAPITAL: Melbourne (3,000,000)
CLIMATE: Highest temp. 50.8° C at Mildura in the north-west. -12.8°C at Mt. Hotham in the Highlands. High rainfall with extremes of heat in summer in the western and north western regions.
Melbourne was first settled in 1835. Victoria is Australia's smallest mainland state with 1800 km of coastline.
Known the 'Garden State', a reference to the rolling green hills and valleys which make up the majority of the state, and varied in scenery, it is has much to offer. To the north the mighty River Murray makes up the bulk of its border to New South Wales, while to the east and south, the Tasman Sea, Bass Strait, and the Southern Ocean have carved out a spectacular coastline which varies from golden beaches to stark outcrops such as the Port Campbell National Park. Also in the north is the Alpine National Park, a skiing area which offers winter sports from around June to September, and mountain-climbing and exploration throughout the rest of the year.
In the west of the state, close to its border with South Australia, desert wilderness areas can be seen. The Little Desert and Wyperfeld National Parks are renowned for the wildflowers which bloom throughout the year, mainly around September, and are popular walking and exploring parks.
Among the major attractions of the state is The Grampians National Park, west of Melbourne. This beautiful area offers walking trails, spectacular lookouts and lake swimming and fishing. South-east of Melbourne, Phillip Island is a popular place to observe the nightly procession of pengiuns returning to their nests after a days activities.
The capital of Victoria, Melbourne, enjoys the reputation of being Australia's Cultural capital, and this is reflected in the many live shows which are presented at the theatres which abound in the city.

   
What are the Cities/towns of Victoria?

MARYBOROUGH

MARYBOROUGH
Although the town of Maryborough owes its origin to gold found at White Hills, Four Mile Flat and the Maryborough Diggings, today it stands as a substantial manufacturing community. The town's historical railway station is said to have prompted visitor, Mark Twain, to observe "Maryborough (is) a railway station with a town attached". You'll understand why when you're here. The equally handsome courthouse, town hall and post office are grouped around Civic Square and date from the town's days as a goldfields administration centre.

   
Where can I go in Victoria?

LOCAL BEACHES AND WALKS AROUND YANAKIE SHALLOW INLET

LOCAL BEACHES AND WALKS AROUND YANAKIE SHALLOW INLET Hourigan Camp Lane Walk - This section of 'The Prom' offers visitors long sandy beaches after a pleasant stroll through a sheltered gully. By walking quietly along the track, you may see and hear the various birds and animals in their natural habitat. The beach offers sandy tidal flats, where at low tide the channel is clearly visible and on high tide a vast sheet of water consumes the Inlet. The area forms part of the Shallow Inlet Marine and Coastal Park and is popular for fishing and windsurfing. From Millar Road (see map) turn into - 'Hourigan Camp Lane', a short unmade road, and drive to the carpark. Once you pass through the small gate, you are in Wilsons Promontory National Park. Follow the track along the boardwalk to the beach. Distance: 400metres/10 - 15mins one way - an easy walk. Lester Road - at the end of this road was the site of the original guest house for those wishing to travel further into the Promontory. From this location, people would wait until low tide, then set off driving around the beach of Shallow Inlet, along Cotters Beach, finally making their way down to the 'Darby River Chalet' (now demolished). Here you will find a lovely beach side picnic area near the caravan park. Adams Road - after a little climb down to the beach, you will find yourself at the lower reaches of the Shallow Inlet channel. This vast area is the nursery and breeding ground of several fish species.

   
What are the Cities/towns of Victoria?

WANGARATTA

WANGARATTA
Wangaratta is a visitor's haven from which to enjoy the delights of the region. Explore over 26 local wineries, the extensive Ovens, Murray River and Lake systems, the Warby Ranges. Discover the haunts of the infamous Kelly gang and the fascinating history of the gold rush days. Wangaratta. heart of the North East is home to Airworld Aviation Museum, The House in Miniature, the Wangaratta Festival of Jazz and the Country Music Festival.

   
What are some places to visit in NSW?

Victoria

Wilsons Promitory
Phillip Island - Penguins, Koalas
Great Ocean Road - Must See
Sovereign Hill, Ballarat
Mildura
Grampians

   
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