Circular Breathing #1

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Can anyone develop circular breath techniques on the didgeridoo?

Circular Breathing #1

Looking for didgeridoo tips? The art of circular breathing is the technique which allows you to play any wind instrument for extended periods of time without having to stop to take a breath. It is accomplished by breathing in through your nose while continuing to play. This skill was developed by the aboriginals a very, very long time ago. As with most things that appear difficult and mysterious there are simple and logical ways to accomplish them. Since it is not possible to breathe in and out at the same time, there has to be a trick. Right? Right! The trick is you don't do both. You store air in your mouth and use the cheek squeeze to expel some of that stored air past your lips. Not blowing air from your lungs but squeezing it out with your cheeks. When you do this you can get a little breath of air in through your nose while squeezing your cheeks together. This may seem awkward at first but it is simply a matter of developing a natural coordination between squeezing air out and breathing in through your nose. Practice this without using the didgeridoo until the squeezing and breathing is a natural coordination. Once it is natural and you don't have to think about it, then try it with your didgeridoo. Remember, no blowing out, squeeze out. Work to make this natural. The most important thing you have to know about circular breathing is that it is not hard or difficult to learn. But it will become difficult if you believe that it is. It will be what you believe it to be. Relax and develop your natural coordination.

   

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